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Bon Appetit
& Brizo


A collaboration of unique perspectives always creates surprising results. In partnership with Bon Appetit magazine, we brought together thought leaders in the kitchen world for a discussion at Condé Nast headquarters in New York. The panel consisted of Alison Cayne, sustainable food advocate and founder of Haven’s Kitchen; Athena Calderone, designer and founder at the well-known site EyeSwoon; and Jordan Bahler, Brizo Lead Industrial Designer. Together, they talked about current trends in the kitchen space—and what the future holds.
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Q: What does the kitchen represent for you?
Athena: I would say that it always represented family and love and togetherness. If the house is a body, the kitchen is the heart.
Jordan: I totally agree… as Athena was saying, you prepare food for your loved ones there. And I think that’s really your opportunity to express your feelings for your friends and your family with the act of serving.
Alison: It’s actually an altar in many cultures around the world. The kitchen is considered the temple of the home.
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Q: How do you approach designing for the kitchen?
Athena: I think that you are always wanting a little bit of contrast and juxtaposition…that’s what creates a little bit of intrigue and curiosity, something that’s not just the strait and narrow.
 
“If the house is a body,
the kitchen is the heart.”



 
Alison Cayne
Q: What about your kitchen has made you a better cook?
Alison: I would say open shelving has made me a better cook, because I can grab quickly, I know exactly what I have, I know exactly what I’m using and what I’m not using…it’s improved my timing and timing is everything.
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Q: What’s happening right now in the kitchen that interests you?
Athena: I feel like I’m seeing a lot of pine floors in homes and kitchens, and combinations of timeless details and slicker, more modern materials.
Alison: People are realizing more and more the importance of sustainability in their food, which is encouraging.
Jordan: Designing for the kitchen in general is interesting because it’s a two-fold assignment; there’s the style aspect and the functionality. It’s a challenge balancing the two in our designs, which means it’s never boring.